Posts in Category: Film

Fences: A Film with Major Award Show Potential

When Viola Davis picked up a Golden Globe for her performance in Fences, there weren’t many surprised people in the audience. Perhaps this is because the film has been heralded as one of the season’s best. With Denzel Washington as the director, it seems as though the movie is able to create more of an emotional impact than many other films competing for major awards. Washington directs himself in a heartbreaking yet brilliant portrayal of Troy Maxson, a character who feels as if somehow he is always just holding his head above water.

 

Playing Maxson’s long-suffering wife Rose, Viola Davis manages to capture all of the joy, sadness and beauty of a woman who has been wronged by her society—and by her husband at times. She provides the moral compass for the story, whether she’s comforting Troy’s older son or fixing a sandwich for his disabled brother Gabe. In the climax of the film, Davis gives the performance of a lifetime, perhaps drawing upon the inspiration of the lives of women in the past who did not have a voice. Set in the 1950s, this film is based on the popular play that preceded it. The play’s author August Wilson brilliantly uses Gabe as a spiritual tool in this piece, reminding the audience of what may await Troy in the hereafter.

 

Although play-to-screen adaptations can be notoriously tough, there are no such problems in this film. Denzel Washington seamlessly takes the words off of the page—and the stage—and transfers them into a film that is breathtakingly beautiful. With universal themes that a lot of families will probably relate to, this touching masterpiece will undoubtedly capture the hearts of the audiences who go to see it.

When Viola Davis picked up a Golden Globe for her performance in Fences, there weren’t many surprised people in the audience. Perhaps this is because the film has been heralded as one of the season’s best. With Denzel Washington as the director, it seems as though the movie is able to create more of an emotional impact than many other films competing for major awards. Washington directs himself in a heartbreaking yet brilliant portrayal of Troy Maxson, a character who feels as if somehow he is always just holding his head above water.

 

Playing Maxson’s long-suffering wife Rose, Viola Davis manages to capture all of the joy, sadness and beauty of a woman who has been wronged by her society—and by her husband at times. She provides the moral compass for the story, whether she’s comforting Troy’s older son or fixing a sandwich for his disabled brother Gabe. In the climax of the film, Davis gives the performance of a lifetime, perhaps drawing upon the inspiration of the lives of women in the past who did not have a voice. Set in the 1950s, this film is based on the popular play that preceded it. The play’s author August Wilson brilliantly uses Gabe as a spiritual tool in this piece, reminding the audience of what may await Troy in the hereafter.

 

Although play-to-screen adaptations can be notoriously tough, there are no such problems in this film. Denzel Washington seamlessly takes the words off of the page—and the stage—and transfers them into a film that is breathtakingly beautiful. With universal themes that a lot of families will probably relate to, this touching masterpiece will undoubtedly capture the hearts of the audiences who go to see it.